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Ants, Cockroaches & Mice

Cockroaches, ants, and mice are probably the most everyday common of household pests. The bother some critters can sometimes seem unstoppable. With cost up on practically everything on the planet, pest control has been something folks have been taking control of within their own domain to save some money and get full satisfaction. There are many companies out there so be wise and choose properly for your best pest control equipment and chemicals you can find. Do your research and be diligent in choosing.

If you live near an urban area or store food anywhere on your property then your property could be vulnerable to cockroaches. They have been around for a very long time and are known for their ability to adapt and survive. Cockroaches are considered pests and if you see just one there's a good chance you have more hidden away somewhere.

Cockroaches have been found as fossils and encased in amber dating back millions of years. Experts estimate that cockroaches are between 350 - 400 million years old.

There is evidence of breeds of cockroaches that have gone extinct. For example, one type of cockroach was found encased in amber that more resembles a praying mantis that your typical roach. It was a ferocious and vicious hunter, it is thought, much different from today’s species.

Cockroaches have even been found to have personalities, with some behaving boldly and others prefer to hide. Scientists believe that this trait, among others, has helped the cockroach survive and to continue to adapt and change to their environment.

Roaches are a firm favorite for the most disgusting looking pests around, but while they are offensive to look at, the risks they pose to humans are even worse. Cockroaches live in sewer environments and come up into homes in search of food and warmth. While they scuttle about your countertops and kitchen cupboards they are leaving behind bacteria, parasites, and pathogens, all of which can affect humans. However, roaches don’t need to contaminate a surface to harm you. They can do it simply by existing. Droppings, urine, decaying roach bodies and shed skin all break down and become air born particles— particles that can pose a serious risk to asthmatics, especially children. The floating roach dust gets into the lungs and causes allergic reactions, proving to be worse for asthma suffers than dog hair, cat fur or even conventional dust.

A common pest in most rural areas, mice may be considered easier on the eyes than the other creatures we have on this list, but they are by far one of the worst offenders when it comes to health risks. Like most pests, mice will scour your house in search of a meal; however, even if they don’t get into your food they will still contaminate your kitchen area.

Mice constantly dribble urine, meaning any surface they come into contact with instantly becomes contaminated. This steady stream means that any diseases they carry such as salmonella or meningitis, both of which can severely affect humans, will be guaranteed to find their way onto your floors and countertops. What makes this even worse is that mouse urine dries fast, becoming invisible, so you might be placing your bread down on a pile of nasty, mouse-ridden bacteria without even knowing.

There are more than 12,000 species of ants all over the world.

An ant can lift 20 times its own body weight. If a second grader was as strong as an ant, she would be able to pick up a car!

Some queen ants can live for many years and have millions of babies!

Ants don’t have ears. Ants "hear" by feeling vibrations in the ground through their feet.

When ants fight, it is usually to the death!

When foraging, ants leave a pheromone trail so that they know where they’ve been.

Queen ants have wings, which they shed when they start a new nest.

Ants don’t have lungs. Oxygen enters through tiny holes all over the body and carbon dioxide leaves through the same holes.

When the queen of the colony dies, the colony can only survive a few months. Queens are rarely replaced and the workers are not able to reproduce.

Although ants are frustrating when they get into your home or when you’re having a picnic, ants do help the environment. They are social insects, which means they live in large colonies or groups. Depending on the species, ant colonies can consist of millions of ants.

There are three kinds of ants in a colony: The queen, the female workers, and males. The queen and the males have wings, while the workers don’t have wings. The queen is the only ant that can lay eggs. The male ant’s job is to mate with future queen ants and they do not live very long afterward. Once the queen grows to adulthood, she spends the rest of her life laying eggs! Depending on the species, a colony may have one queen or many queens.

Ant colonies also have soldier ants that protect the queen, defend the colony, gather or kill food, and attack enemy colonies in search for food and nesting space. If they defeat another ant colony, they take away eggs of the defeated ant colony. When the eggs hatch, the new ants become the "slave" ants for the colony. Some jobs of the colony include taking care of the eggs and babies, gathering food for the colony and building the ant hills or mounds.